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They Shall Not Grow Old


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Who else saw this?  It was pretty damned impressive.  If you haven't seen it and have the faintest interest in military history this is a must see. Also you should watch the interview with Peter Jackson at the end of the film.

One scene that I found pretty amazing was the one where the officer was lecturing the troops - they found the transcript of that speech and were able to lip sycnh the words.

What a f**king miserable experience fighting in the trenchs must have been.......

I was particularly struck by what poor condition the troops' teeth were often  in.

 

Edited by Wandering Tellurian
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I haven't seen it unfortunately, but I learned about it a couple weeks ago watching the Corridor Crew channel. They discus some of the technology involved with producing the documentary. It's pretty crazy how much work was put in to make the footage look and sound so modern.

 

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1 minute ago, 0xDEAFC0DE said:

I haven't seen it unfortunately, but I learned about it a couple weeks ago watching the Corridor Crew channel. They discus some of the technology involved with producing the documentary. It's pretty crazy how much work was put in to make the footage look and sound so modern.

 

The kinda sad thing is that there is so much more footage that needs to be restored.  Unfortunately it is an expensive process.

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Just now, Mega Tank said:

I believe it was limited showings across the U.S. last year during the holidays. It seemed like a heck of a film. 

It looks really impressive. I wish I had a chance to see it in the theater. It seems like that would really make the experience.

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Here is some interesting footage of WWI tanks:

(One of the tank in the video (the Saint Chamond) couldn't be used in battle - the nose stuck out over the treads too far and would bury itself in the opposite trench wall and get stuck. The French converted them to supply and troop carriers.)

In actual combat most of the tanks used (by any country) broke down before they could attack the enemy.

Edited by Wandering Tellurian
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My father in law took my wife and I to see it at a local theater and we really enjoyed it. Crazy to see when it transitions to color as well as learning about the aforementioned lip-reading.

 

You can definitely tell it was a passion film from Peter Jackson, the dude even had his own artillery they used to make some of the blasts.

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4 hours ago, doner24 said:

Haven’t watched it yet, but having a chance to visit WWI battlefields and go through some of the actual trenches on the western front was an eye opening experience I’ll never forget. 

There are still areas of France that are uninhabited (by law) since there are vast quantities of unexploded munitions lying under the surface of the ground.  The French government is slowly removing them but it is a costly and hazardous task.  Particularly nasty are unexploded gas shells which are rusting out and easily release their poisonous payloads.

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It was a great movie that I'd recommend to anybody interested in WW1. Between the gas and lice and rats and the sirens and being forced to go over the top and run towards certain death, I can't imagine how hellish it must have been to fight there. Interesting to note, the last living soldier to have fought in WW1 died only eight years ago in England.

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I did get a chance to see it in theaters with my family, and it was indeed absolutely amazing and breathtaking. People always comment on the visuals, which are certainly astonishing, but one thing in particular I noticed in our theater was the audio. The audio was equally as amazing, obviously stuff like the lip-syncing, but even just the artillery going off all around you, gunshots, bullets whizzing by. The whole thing was an amazing and eye-opening experience for sure. I would definitely highly recommend that anyone watch this film. It may not quite have the same effect as it does watching it in 3D in a big theater with good surround sound, but it'll still be sure to leave you amazed. Still hoping to get the blu-ray at some point so I can show it to my grandparents next time I visit, as I'm sure they'd enjoy it.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So basically they took some original B/W footage and made it into color?  It really does look great and with apologies for all those back in the 80s who considered it sacrilge the first attempts(?) at colorizing b/w movies/films/etc I honestly love colorized films/photos provided they did a good job.  It just really makes the era truly come to life in a way that just a few decades ago nobody could've ever dreamed possible (true back in the day you would manually "color tint" film but that's nowhere near the same).  One of my main hopes for the 2020s is that technology will advance that no longer will you have to go through a painstakingly manual process to make b/w into color...you can use a special computer program/converter or whatnot to automatically colorize it and do a good job at it.  Imagine what the old b/w TV shows will be like in full color!

For example, you really think Times Square in the 40s done in b/w could really do it justice?

 

Edited by Estil
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On 1/5/2020 at 6:53 PM, Estil said:

So basically they took some original B/W footage and made it into color?  It really does look great and with apologies for all those back in the 80s who considered it sacrilge the first attempts(?) at colorizing b/w movies/films/etc I honestly love colorized films/photos provided they did a good job.  It just really makes the era truly come to life in a way that just a few decades ago nobody could've ever dreamed possible (true back in the day you would manually "color tint" film but that's nowhere near the same).  One of my main hopes for the 2020s is that technology will advance that no longer will you have to go through a painstakingly manual process to make b/w into color...you can use a special computer program/converter or whatnot to automatically colorize it and do a good job at it.  Imagine what the old b/w TV shows will be like in full color!

For example, you really think Times Square in the 40s done in b/w could really do it justice?

That's a vast understatement of the amount of work put into the movie by a huge team of professionals that Peter Jackson hired.

I saw it in the theaters, and after the movie, there was a 20 minutes behind the scenes segment that showed some of the technology needed to get the old videos cleaned (frame by frame) and put at the proper frame rate and then colorized,  and then all the audio work. I hope that segment got added to the Blu-Ray as an extra.

 

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