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profholt82

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About profholt82

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  1. Indeed. Interesting conversation, but not exactly a movie I like returning to. Well, I only speak for myself, not anyone else. But some filmmakers can take stories with little action and make them compelling visually with techniques. I'm thinking Welles, Antonioni, Lynch, Hawks, some others. They can do things with the camera and settings to make a motion picture. Just spitballing here to demonstrate what I mean, taking the GGGR script, you could make one of the conversations take place in a car instead of a diner to have movement on the screen. The camera could show us the reflections of the actors' eyes and/or mouths in the rearview and/or vanity mirrors, and perhaps there would be a crack in the glass to symbolize the way his words are hurting the feelings of the other. In a scene such as when Spacey is angry, a close up could be used to accentuate his facial expression or his clenched fist. They could show the condensation beading down the glass of ice water in the diner when Pacino is swindling the rube to convey the heat and pressure he's feeling from the sales pitch. Or along that line, we could see a close up of Jack Lemon's brow as he sweats while stressing over his failure. These are the types of artistic avenues available in the motion picture medium which are not available on the stage for plays. GGGR as it is, is simply a straight translation of the play that doesn't utilize the motion picture medium. It's essentially a filmed play. It's still great due to the excellent script and world class actors involved, however, as I stated before. I'm just rarely thrilled about stage to screen translations. I'd rather see the play.
  2. I always felt that this one didn't translate particularly well from the stage to the screen. Every performance is compelling, however, so it's well worth a watch. But there's no movement, no action, the settings are static, et cetera. They might as well have filmed the stage production because no effort was made to translate it into a motion picture. Excellent script, excellent characterizations, and top notch performances, made it an excellent play. But a stationary camera watching guys sitting down in an office or diner having conversations for 2 hours does not really lend itself well to the motion picture picture medium in my opinion. Edit: I rated it a 6
  3. Definitely a US release, it's just one of the rarer titles. Was released in 1990. Even back when nobody was collecting SMS 10ish years ago, it was pricey, often pushing $100 complete. Here's the once over about it: https://segaretro.org/Heavyweight_Champ_(8-bit) Edit: also, I should add that it is a completely different game than Buster Douglas on the Genesis. Different developers. The Master System game actually plays and looks a lot like Rocky, just without the training stages.
  4. SMW is all right, good game and all, but not nearly as fun as SMB 3 in my opinion. SMB 3 is one of the best games on the NES.
  5. Yeah, I feel the same way when I read them. Hahahahaha, just kidding. You're doing awesome work.
  6. Very nice! Shortly before Coronageddon hit, I took the family for a Disney World vacation, this was mid-February. We went to the new Star Wars park one day, and while there was tons of cool merch, they didn't have much in the way of Baby Yoda stuff. There were shirts and socks, but no figures or stuffed toys. I read that they didn't produce any toys or anything before the show aired because they didn't want it to leak and spoil the surprise. I imagine that there will be tons of Baby Yoda stuff on the shelves by this Christmas season though. Anyway, your build-a-bear is awesome.
  7. Well, the CDI has barely any games. It's got lots of computer software type of stuff, so I've never had much interest in it. And while I'd love to have a NeoGeo proper, I just don't want to put that kind of money into the hobby, super expensive. Maybe I'll get a Neo CD one of these days though, Neo for hobos as they call it. Hahaha But I love the 3do. I don't know what the consoles run nowadays, but I don't think they're that bad, and there are several versions. What's cool is that there were over 300 games released for it, so there's tons of great stuff to play. I don't have a ton of games for it, probably 30 to 40, but it's been fun seeking out the games I like and collecting for it.
  8. I still have that card, "Mutton Chop Yaz." They are magnificent sideburns.
  9. I had an Atari 2600 in the 80s, then got an NES in about 89 or 90, then a Genesis 3 or 4 years after that. But I grew up on a street with a bunch of kids, so I had a neighbor with a Sega Master System that I played all the time while I was still nursing my Atari, and my buddy down the street had a Commodore 64 which we played all the time. By 93/94 when the 3DO, NeoGeo, CDI were around, I never owned one, but I was a Gamepro subscriber, so I kept up on what all was out at the time. When the 32x came out in fall 94, I got one and picked up Doom for it. This was at a time when Doom was only out for the 32x and Jaguar, and the one kid in the 6th grade who had a Jag didn't have Doom. At that time, you had to have an expensive PC to handle Doom well, so for a few months there, my 32x made me the envy of the 6th grade as we could play Doom on my tv. Hahaha, seems silly in retrospect, but it was a big deal at the time. When I hit jr high or so (95), a buddy of mine got a 3DO, and we played quite a bit of it, but this was at the time when it was marked down because the Saturn had either just come out or was about to. The Playstation was on the horizon as well. But I remember playing lots of Road Rash, Need for Speed and Fifa Soccer during sleepovers and whatnot. What's cool about that is about 4 or 5 years ago, that same buddy visited me, and got excited going through my game collection. When I asked him about the 3DO, he said that it was still in a box at his parents' house, and we worked out a deal for it, and I ended up getting it from him. It's actually become one of my favorite consoles over the past few years.
  10. Had some free time this afternoon, and played a ton of the Mega Drive shmup Zero Wing that I recently picked up. Then I thought, you know what, I should probably see if I can beat my Turtles 3 score while I've still got the house to myself. And sure enough, I managed to improve it to 246,900. Shout out to @NESfiend for the BeBop boss fight tip.
  11. I highly recommend importing Japanese games, for the non-RPG/text heavy games anyway. While the Saturn floundered in the US, it was a massive hit in Japan, so the games are much more plentiful (over 1000 games released) and inexpensive there. And you can play foreign releases on a North American Saturn with any save or ram expansion cart like an Action Replay for instance, they bypass the region lock. If you're mostly into the collecting aspect or whatever though, yeah, the rarer US Saturn games have always been expensive. And the fluctuations on the heavy hitters are just part of the fun. Hahaha
  12. The Dark Queen from Battletoads and Alis from Phantasy Star are my two favorites. But I'll throw in Irene the "mysterious girl" from Ninja Gaiden. She has that femme fatale noir thing going on which is hot.
  13. I loved the Bookit program. Really cool to see the pic of the button and certificate, that brings me back. My Pizza Hut had a jukebox and a Neo Geo candy cab with Samurai Shodown and Neo Turf Masters, so getting to go to Pizza Hut to redeem my Bookit stars for a personal pan was always a special night. I lived for the Goosebumps series in those days.
  14. Derp! Made another run, and followed the rules this time. Still shat the bed against BeBop though. Between that extender ball and chain and his long kick reach, I have a heck of time fighting him without taking damage.
  15. 169,500 My first life I died on Rocksteady in the 1st stage, somewhere around 40,000. Final death came in the 3rd level BeBop fight. I swear I was much better at this game when I was 10. Hahahaha I'll give it another shot later this week.
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