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Game Boy Player PCB Request


umjammercammy

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I have a Game Boy Player in non-working condition that I've had since childhood. Long story short and one tragic backstory later my mom got in a not-so-great relationship with a not-so-great guy at one point when I was young who decided to take out his adult temper tantrum on my poor Gamecube one night. After he hurled it at the wall like a cubical wrecking ball made of Japanese plastic (I guess Chinese technically based on the sticker on the bottom of my specific console) the Game Boy Player ceased to work correctly and the system has forever been cracked and bulging apart since.

All that aside, now that I'm 23 and I know how to solder I decided to take apart my GBP and peep inside for any possible damage that might've occurred that night, and lo and behold there's a missing... transistor? I believe? At position "U20" on the board. It's a tiny SMD transistor as far as I know (god I hate microsoldering) but it's missing entirely, leaving just the solder points behind.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinion as to whether I should just get a new GBP or try to replace this transistor, and if so, would anyone be willing to take apart their Game Boy Player and take a hi-res photo of their U20 transistor? Or, alternatively, read off the value of the transistor that's missing. I'd honestly appreciate it immensely.

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Does it actually look like a component was placed? A lot of times manufactures leave unpopulated areas on the board. These changes with board revisions or regional differences, I'm no expert on the gameboy player though, I don't have access to mine at the moment, otherwise I would take a pic for ya.

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1 hour ago, SNESNESCUBE64 said:

Does it actually look like a component was placed? A lot of times manufactures leave unpopulated areas on the board. These changes with board revisions or regional differences, I'm no expert on the gameboy player though, I don't have access to mine at the moment, otherwise I would take a pic for ya.

Yeah, there was definitely a transistor there prior. There's photos online of the PCB showing the transistor but none of them are a high enough resolution for me to read the actual value.

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On 1/22/2020 at 3:58 PM, umjammercammy said:

I have a Game Boy Player in non-working condition that I've had since childhood. Long story short and one tragic backstory later my mom got in a not-so-great relationship with a not-so-great guy at one point when I was young who decided to take out his adult temper tantrum on my poor Gamecube one night. After he hurled it at the wall like a cubical wrecking ball made of Japanese plastic (I guess Chinese technically based on the sticker on the bottom of my specific console) the Game Boy Player ceased to work correctly and the system has forever been cracked and bulging apart since.

All that aside, now that I'm 23 and I know how to solder I decided to take apart my GBP and peep inside for any possible damage that might've occurred that night, and lo and behold there's a missing... transistor? I believe? At position "U20" on the board. It's a tiny SMD transistor as far as I know (god I hate microsoldering) but it's missing entirely, leaving just the solder points behind.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinion as to whether I should just get a new GBP or try to replace this transistor, and if so, would anyone be willing to take apart their Game Boy Player and take a hi-res photo of their U20 transistor? Or, alternatively, read off the value of the transistor that's missing. I'd honestly appreciate it immensely.

If I have time tonight, I'll get you a pic. Otherwise, I can get you one this weekend.

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2 hours ago, MachineCode said:

If you can wait a few days, I'll do it for you. I'm sick as fuck right now and just don't have the energy to take it apart for photos.

I understand completely.

2 hours ago, DoctorEncore said:

If I have time tonight, I'll get you a pic. Otherwise, I can get you one this weekend.

Thanks a ton, I really appreciate it. Sorry about the hassle.

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On 1/22/2020 at 3:58 PM, umjammercammy said:

I have a Game Boy Player in non-working condition that I've had since childhood. Long story short and one tragic backstory later my mom got in a not-so-great relationship with a not-so-great guy at one point when I was young who decided to take out his adult temper tantrum on my poor Gamecube one night. After he hurled it at the wall like a cubical wrecking ball made of Japanese plastic (I guess Chinese technically based on the sticker on the bottom of my specific console) the Game Boy Player ceased to work correctly and the system has forever been cracked and bulging apart since.

All that aside, now that I'm 23 and I know how to solder I decided to take apart my GBP and peep inside for any possible damage that might've occurred that night, and lo and behold there's a missing... transistor? I believe? At position "U20" on the board. It's a tiny SMD transistor as far as I know (god I hate microsoldering) but it's missing entirely, leaving just the solder points behind.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinion as to whether I should just get a new GBP or try to replace this transistor, and if so, would anyone be willing to take apart their Game Boy Player and take a hi-res photo of their U20 transistor? Or, alternatively, read off the value of the transistor that's missing. I'd honestly appreciate it immensely.

This was significantly more difficult than I thought it would be. 馃槕 Note to self: Never help anyone ever.

Hope this helps! Looks like it's labeled A7 with some dots indicating something.

IMG_20200125_155953.thumb.jpg.05f3208cf057b1e37673f2fc14209634.jpg

IMG_20200125_155737.thumb.jpg.09e75dfb648a0c47c0cf203488a1bf78.jpg

IMG_20200125_160028.thumb.jpg.cd0481550da1578d4e3f5d108bca094a.jpg

IMG_20200125_160043.thumb.jpg.6ee2334a10a0547acb050ffab82b38fb.jpg

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