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Episode 18: Chumlee's Adventure: The Quest for Pinky


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A Homebrew Draws Near!

A blog series by @Scrobins

Episode 18: Chumlee’s Adventure: The Quest for Pinky

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Introduction:

There has been an awakening. Have you felt it? Modern icons of pop culture and homebrews, coming together. Commissioned. Official. Licensed. Where first, barely a year ago there was Jay & Silent Bob: Mall Brawl, another game pushes the floodgates open a little further, with the dev team announcing yet another licensed homebrew coming in its wake. No longer a one-off happenstance, we are witnessing a change in era within the homebrew world. Let the good times roll.

For this entry, I’m covering Chumlee’s Adventure: The Quest for Pinky, a beat 'em up adventure game for the NES, starring the cast of Pawn Stars, and developed by KHAN Games, Peek-A-Brews!, and humanthomas. As of the time of this writing, Kickstarter backers have received their goodies, and the physical game is still available here through the World Famous Gold & Silver Pawn Shop.

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CIB? Best I can do is...a million dollars

 

Development Team:

@KHAN Games(Kevin Hanley): programming

@Peek-A-Brews!(Jon Piornack): graphical art

@humanthomas(Thomas Cipollone): music

Blurry Sprites (Richard Lecce & Mike Long): funding

Chumlee (Austin Russell): inspiration

 

Game Evolution:

The emergence of Chumlee’s Adventure started with a trickle and slowly grew to a stream. During his annual NES Spectrum Marathon, a 50+ hour gaming marathon which raises money for the Organization for Autism Research every September, Kevin hinted at a special project he was commissioned to develop that he couldn’t talk about just yet. (It just so happens this year’s marathon is happening this weekend, so tune in on Twitch!)

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A fun event that I look forward to tuning into each year

On December 14, 2020, Kevin tweeted a gif of a bearded, sunglass-wearing dude jump kicking the “kick” into Kickstarter, followed by the date “December 28” as a little pupper wandered in. On December 28, 2020, the latest episode of Pawn Stars aired, featuring a customer who brought in an M82 unit (NES demo kiosk) that just happened to house a few of Kevin’s games inside. The episode’s narrative shows Chumlee inspired to make a game of his own after learning about the existence of the homebrew community, and from there Chumlee’s Adventure begins to take shape, much to the amusement of his friends and coworkers at the store.

Concurrent with the episode’s airing, Kevin launched the Kickstarter. Within 19 hours, Chumlee’s Adventure reached its initial funding goal, ultimately receiving more than $29,000 from 350 supporters. Backer tiers included a Chumlee keychain, a Chumlee shirt, a game rom, and four different colored CIB editions such as a Blue CIB, a Green CIB with t-shirt and keychain limited to 150 copies, an orange CIB with t-shirt and keychain limited to 75 copies, and a Yellow CIB autographed by Chumlee with laser-etched numbering on the cartridge plus the t-shirt, sticker, and special keychain.

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The first teaser…what could it beeeee?

 

Gameplay Overview:

Chumlee’s Adventure is a side-scrolling beat ‘em up in the style of the NES black box classic Kung Fu. You play as Chumlee, longtime employee of the World Famous Gold & Silver Pawn Shop, desperate for a day off with his dog Pinky. But before he gets a break, he’ll have to fight through waves of customers and their wares, as well as his coworkers Antwaun, Corey, Rick, and more, or else it’s back to WORK!

Gameplay is simple: move left and right with the respective d-pad buttons, duck by pushing down, jump with the A button, and attack with the B button. Chum has other attacks up his sleeve if he attacks while jumping or ducking. If you feel like challenging a friend, the 2-player mode allows you to swap every time you die so can have a high score challenge.

The game’s heads up display has some helpful info for you. There are the 1st and 2nd player scoreboards, sandwiching a high score ally for those looking to one-up themselves. The Player life bar shows Chumlee’s health and the Boss life bar displays each floor’s boss’ life. The four squares indicate which floor you’re currently on so you can track your progress. The Chum head marks how many lives you have left, while the Pinky icon denotes how many times you’ve looped the game (though something interesting begins to happen for truly dedicated players who play long enough). Finally, the timer ticks down how long you have to complete each floor, boss included, lest you dawdle too long admiring what’s behind the display cases and on the shelves in the background.

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Gameplay gif from Chumlee’s Adventure

 

Writer’s Review:

Chumlee’s Adventure provides a fun, straightforward beat ‘em up that elevates its Kung Fu inspiration. This is a game that is fun to play and stays replayable while remaining faithful to the simplicity of an early black box game. Gameplay features a good range of moves to dispatch an unending stream of enemies that will keep players on their toes while maintaining a good balance of difficulty. Boss battles are challenging pattern puzzles, bringing in a fun taste of the Pawn Stars cast’s personalities. The real risk is that you might lose a life having a laugh at how creatively each boss battle is designed. Meanwhile the final boss battle adds a kind of puzzle that leverages the developers’ deep knowledge of gaming tropes to offer something a little different within the game. Each stage is fairly short, encouraging you to want to loop the game again and again (assuming you’re figured out each boss’ pattern) as you search the shelves of the store and everywhere else imaginable for the famed easter egg.

Chumlee’s graphics are a great 8-bit rendering of the show, from the shop itself to its colorful employees. Licensed games used to have a reputation that cultivated a campy “so bad it’s good” love, if not outright disappointment, but Jon’s graphics probably make all of the Pawn Stars cast wish they had a full-sized poster of their 8-bit portraits.

Meanwhile Thomas’ music builds on the sounds of the original Kung Fu with his usual flair, making Chumlee’s Adventure a black box soundtrack with a rock ‘n roll makeover. While the regular stage music is playful, it maintains a serious tone that helps you concentrate. Boss battles have a more tense vibe (which Kung Fu never had), followed by a dance-in-your-seat jam to help you celebrate conquering another stage.

 

Interviews:

Having already interviewed each member of the development team about their backgrounds for previous episodes, I decided to take this opportunity to check in with everyone and ask some different questions for a change.

If you’d like to read those previous interviews, see below!

Kevin Hanley- Interview from The Assembly Line

Jon Piornack- Interview from 8-Bit Xmas 2020

Thomas Cipollone- Interview from Anguna: Scourge of the Goblin King

 

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KHAN Games

@atonofglaciers

-It’s great to interview you again! Last time we chatted about the Assembly Line, and I’m excited to dive more into your dev work. How have you been since we last chatted?

Pretty good! I got hired to do another decently sized project, so I have been doing a lot of preliminary stuff with Jon from Peek-a-Brews! To figure out exactly how we want to tackle things, but it’s always exciting to start something new. We get that great rush of adrenaline coming up with things we want to do before the grim reality sets in of how hard it will be. 🙂

 

-How did your relationship with the people at Pawn Stars come about? Where did this game begin? Were you a fan of the show beforehand? Had you ever visited Rick Harrison's Gold & Silver Pawn Shop?

Deniz Kahn, who had been on Pawn Stars a couple times as the resident expert of sealed games, is a friend of mine and I guess when he was talking with the people there about retro games and the booming collector scene, they thought it might be a good idea to have a game made. Deniz dropped my name and they followed up with me through my website.

Initially I thought it was a joke because I really was a fan of the show. I actually watched it for many years beforehand, back when I lived in Colorado. I never made it out to Las Vegas to visit the shop, but knowing I was working on a game for people I was a fan of was an interesting situation to be in.

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure marks yet another licensed homebrew game, after Jay & Silent Bob: Mall Brawl. Does the homebrew scene feel different to you, as either someone who worked on this game, someone who creates homebrew in general, or even as a player, as a result of these licensed, commissioned projects?

Well, I think this is a few different questions packed into one so I’m not entirely sure how to answer. Yes, the homebrew scene definitely feels different now days. Back when projects were initially being made with the intention to produce and distribute them it was more of a fun “let’s see if I can do this” kinda project and the community felt much smaller. You were selling every new game you made to the same 200-300 people, which was great. You had a personal connection to the people who were enjoying the things you did.

Things are much bigger now, both in scope of games and in the size of the audience on the receiving end, so it’s much less personal, but there are certainly pros and cons of both sizes. At the end of the day we want the most people playing our games as we can get, but it is at the expense of personal connection, so I think something is getting lost as the years go by. But this could also be the byproduct of forums going away. Social media feeds are just too cluttered to feel truly connected.

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure’s gameplay channels Kung Fu, a game I was addicted to as a kid. Was that a game you especially loved in the past? -What was the working dynamic like in your collaboration with Chumlee and Blurry Sprites, as well Jon and Thomas? What was the division of labor on Chumlee’s Adventure, and how was the development process between members of the team?

I was never personally a fan of Kung Fu. Early black box games seem pretty archaic to me in many ways, so when I sit down to play an NES game, I typically jump ahead to some of the more advanced stuff. But Blurry Sprites came into the project knowing they wanted their game to be based off of Kung Fu, which made it easier for us (Jon, Thomas and myself) because we had a concrete idea of a starting point and the direction we wanted to take it.

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Screenshot from Kung Fu

The working dynamic was nice because they (Chumlee and Blurry Sprites) really gave us the freedom to do what we wanted with the game, other than having it be based on Kung Fu. But the three-month deadline went well with the archaic, smaller nature of the game.

Jon did the artwork, I did the programming, and Thomas did the music and sound effects. It was a pretty basic distribution of “WORK!”

 

-What is it like developing a game containing such cultural icons as the cast of Pawn Stars? Did you have a different attitude toward developing Chumlee’s Adventure compared to developing games for your own intellectual property? Is the experience of developing them different? Does playing within the sandbox of real people as video game characters impose limits on what you can do with them?

I think developing games based on real life people (or at least caricatures of people) is even more fun than creating entirely fictional characters because you can take quirks or personality traits that they’re known for and play with those a bit. The one drawback of being hired to do a project is you don’t get the final say in what something turns out to be in the end. They gave us a ton of freedom, but at the end of the day they had the final say in things so there were one or two things that we were super stoked on that they wound up taking out. Mostly out of fear of “what if” situations. You never know what is going to offend someone these days and I don’t blame them for wanting to be cautious. Chum Fu would have been a great name though.

 

-What new challenges or surprises surfaced in developing Chumlee’s Adventure as opposed to NEScape or Larry and the Long Look for a Lucious Lover from a programming perspective?

This was the first project that introduced enemies coming onto the screen from offscreen that I had done, so it was an interesting puzzle of trying to decide if I wanted them to appear in the same spot each time, or if I wanted to go the timer route and have them appear at the same TIME every game, but at different points in the level depending on how quickly the player is playing. I wound up going this direction in the end because it allows for a little more variety and change each new time the player is playing.

It was also the first game I did that had boss fights, so it was interesting trying to program each of those along with the different hitboxes with the different moves Chumlee can do. He is wider when he’s jumping or squatting so I didn’t do nearly enough planning in my code to code that stuff well.

 

-TheMetalBeast was the first to find a special Easter Egg in the game and won a fun prize in the process. Are there other, as yet undiscovered secrets still waiting to be found?

With the three-month deadline we didn’t have a lot of time to put too much special stuff in, so while I won’t confirm or deny that there might be some other goodies in there that haven’t been found yet, there isn’t too much more.

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Ironic considering the point of the game is to escape work

 

-There was a lot of buzz around Chumlee’s Adventure when it launched on Kickstarter, with some of the limited-edition tiers selling out right away. How does it feel to bask in such enthusiasm and support?

I’m always blown away with the people who support the projects I do. That was my second Kickstarter project so I was always curious if the first one’s success was a fluke, but the people who have supported me through the years yet again came out in full force and pushed us over the funding goal super quickly. I am honestly humbled by it. I truly appreciate everyone who cares about the stuff I do.

 

-On top of the excitement on Kickstarter, Pawn Stars showed off Chumlee’s Adventure on an episode of the show, after a customer came in with a very interesting cabinet loaded with several of your other games. What was it like seeing your games on a TV show with such high viewership, and then see Chumlee himself playing your game?

I can’t overstate how much of a big deal this was to me. My dad is a huge fan of the show, so when he found out something I did was going to be on it he was looking forward to it a lot. A LOT. It might have been the proudest he’s ever been of me. Or maybe it was just the first thing I’ve ever done that he could relate to on some tangible level.

But a lot of my family and extended family were tuned in watching, and I was personally watching it with a few of my friends. I knew the game was going to be featured, and they had asked me to send them a few of my games ahead of time because they didn’t want to go through getting approval to show licensed games, so I knew they were using my games, but I didn’t know in what context. So in that sense it was scary not knowing exactly how they were going to present my games. But when the show was on and they actually namedropped me… I don’t know. It was just a really emotional night. Tears of happiness were shed. I was receiving texts and calls and the whole thing was just really surreal. One of the best nights of my life, for sure. I’ll never be able to thank them enough for giving me the opportunity to be a part of this project. The fact that it wasn’t just briefly shown, but almost the entire episode wrapped around NES games… it was so special. A really big night for homebrew for sure.

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Now THAT’S what I call a shout out

 

-Are there any other projects you have lined up on the horizon, NES or otherwise? Any dream projects?

Like I said previously I recently got hired to make a new game for the guy who does the Onyx the Fortuitous videos. I’m really excited about this project because we’re going to be tackling some more things I’ve never done so it will push all of us, hopefully to new levels of awesomeness. I dunno. Satan’s cool.

As for my dream project, I don’t know. I really want to get back to finishing Courier, Jon’s dream project. The longer we’ve worked on that game the more I am starting to think it’s turning into my dream project also. It’s going to be such a great game!

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Everything about this image is so right

 

-Are there any homebrew games in development that you are excited to play since we last spoke?

Mostly everything I’ve wanted to be play has come out at this point, but Full Quiet and Orange Island are high on my list!

 

 -I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with me and share your experiences. Is there anything else you would like to tell readers and fans?

It’s pronounced “gif”.

 

-If you could be recruited for the next licensed homebrew game based on another pillar of pop culture, what would you want it to be?

There might be a project coming up related to professional skateboarding which is another huge interest of mine. Can’t wait to say more as the details materialize. 🙂

 

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Peek-A-Brews!

@peekabrews

-It’s great to interview you again! Last time we chatted about your work on 8-Bit Xmas 2020, and I’m excited to talk to you again. How have you been since we last chatted?

Thanks, I am glad to be back!

To be honest, this year has been a bit of a rollercoaster but I think it’s on the way up so I won’t jinx it by boring you with the details. I will say, however, that these homebrew projects and the people I have been working with have been a constant positive during all of it. I am thankful for that.

And I hope all is well with you!

 

-What is it like working on a game containing such cultural icons as the cast of Pawn Stars?

It’s surreal. I feel like I am going to use that word often, even with new projects that are still in the pipeline, but it is the most accurate word to describe it. To say that I helped make a game for a popular TV show this early on is just crazy to me.

 

-Were you a fan of the show beforehand? Had you ever visited Rick Harrison's Gold & Silver Pawn Shop?

I was never a die-hard fan but I definitely watched it when it first came out and I still catch segments that interest me on YouTube to this day.

You know, Las Vegas is not my first choice for a vacation, but I found myself there at least four times in my life and I have never been to the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop. Kevin and I entertained the idea of visiting during the Kickstarter campaign but it never panned out.

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure marks yet another licensed homebrew game, after Jay & Silent Bob: Mall Brawl. Does the homebrew scene feel different to you, as either someone who worked on this game, someone who creates pixel art for homebrew in general, or even as a player, as a result of these licensed, commissioned projects?

If I were to analyze it from all three of those perspectives, I think I would come to the same conclusion, and it’s that the scene is getting more exciting to me. I am excited to see what the next licensed game will be, I am excited to play the next licensed game, and I am excited to work on another licensed game. I am not saying that developers should only focus on licensed games now. Even if that was possible, it would be stupid to put all of our original ideas aside. I am just saying that it adds a bit of fun, mystery, and hopefully more validity to what we do.

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure’s gameplay channels Kung Fu, a game I was addicted to as a kid. Was that a game you especially loved in the past?

Actually, it wasn’t a game I loved as a kid. I remember playing it and thinking it was repetitive and too difficult. I don’t know, maybe it was a situation where I played something like Ninja Gaiden first and that ruined it for me. I really should’ve given it more of a chance, though, because I had fun playing it as “research” for Chumlee’s Adventure.

 

-What was the working dynamic like in your collaboration with Kevin and Thomas, as well as Chumlee and Blurry Sprites?

I have so many things to thank Kevin for again. Not only did he recommend me for the job, but he pretty much handled all the communication with everyone else. He is very easy going and a pleasure to work with. I specifically remember having some fun brainstorming sessions about who the bosses would be and how they would attack. I think we both got a kick out of having backward controls for Dark Chumlee and making the player position him into the falling fan hazards. What I quickly learned about Thomas is that I will never worry about the music when he is on board. Man, he is good at what he does. Did you get a chance to hear the last track on Beyond the Pins? So good.

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Title screen from Beyond the Pins, product of The Assembly Line Game Jam 2021

 

-Did you have a different attitude toward creating pixel art for Chumlee’s Adventure compared to previous projects? Does the experience of designing art for a game revolving around real people affect your creative process?

I’ll admit that I was a bit nervous. I felt there was more of a chance for someone to criticize the graphics because it did involve an actual place and real people. It wouldn’t be something that I could just chalk up to interpretation. That might sound silly to someone else because we are talking about graphics on the NES, but I take it seriously and I wanted to do it justice. The two things that helped a lot in that respect was having a short deadline and the game being a Kung Fu clone. If I had too much time to work on it, it probably wouldn’t have had that early black box feel to it.

 

-What new challenges or surprises surfaced in working on Chumlee’s Adventure?

I guess the challenge was making the game in a small amount of time and the surprise was that it was shelved for a year due to the pandemic. Weird times.

 

-There was a lot of buzz around Chumlee’s Adventure when it launched on Kickstarter. On its page Kevin gave you a shoutout for your previous collaboration on NEScape. How does it feel to be such a prominent pixel artist?

Oh that’s just Kevin talking me up! There is so much more for me to learn and hopefully people enjoy what I make along the way.

 

-Are there any other projects you have lined up on the horizon, NES or otherwise? Any dream projects?

There are a few, actually. I am doing backgrounds for a game being made by Sergio and the Holograms (A Winner Is You). I don’t think he is ready to announce anything specific just yet though. Kevin, Thomas, and I have been hired for another licensed game we will be starting very soon. Also, I just got word from Brian (retroUSB) on what the next 8-Bit Xmas game will be. And finally, I will always have my game Courier sprinkled in between there until it’s done. So, lots of cool stuff.

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It's the most wonderful time of the year! There’ll be blinky lights glowing,

and chiptunes a’ flowing, like Xmases long long ago!

 

-Are there any homebrew games in development that you are excited to play since we last spoke?

I am excited to get my hands on Anguna: Scourge of the Goblin King. I was backer #1 for that baby! And I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again – Full Quiet and Orange Island.

 

-If you could be recruited for the next licensed homebrew game based on another pillar of pop culture, what would you want it to be?

Oh, that’s a good question but I think I’ll keep this one close to the chest. I wouldn’t want anyone beating me to the punch on an approachable license that I’m interested in.

 

-I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with me and share your experiences. Is there anything else you would like to tell readers and fans?

I would just like to say thanks to anyone that has supported, played, or helped spread the word about any project that I have been a part of. I really appreciate it.

Fun fact: I put an Easter Egg in NEScape! that Kevin hasn’t found yet.

 

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Humanthomas

@thehumanthomas

-It’s great to interview you again! Last time we chatted about your work on Anguna Zero, now titled Anguna: Scourge of the Goblin King, and I’m excited to talk to you again. How have you been since we last chatted?

I have been doing well! Mostly just trying to survive and do my part in finishing up Full Quiet. We are getting a lot of good feedback from early testers!

 

-What is it like working on a game containing such cultural icons as the cast of Pawn Stars?

Working on the Pawn Stars game was really fun. I never expected to get mail directly from the Gold & Silver Pawn Shop, but that was a nice perk of working with them.

 

-Were you a fan of the show beforehand? Had you ever visited Rick Harrison's Gold & Silver Pawn Shop?

I hadn't watched the show in quite a while before we started working on Chumlee's Adventure, but I made sure to tune in for our episode 😎

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure marks yet another licensed homebrew game, after Jay & Silent Bob: Mall Brawl. Does the homebrew scene feel different to you, as either someone who worked on this game, someone who composes for homebrew in general, or even as a player, as a result of these licensed, commissioned projects?

I think it is awesome that NES homebrew is getting this level attention.  Most folks probably don't even realize you can still turn on an NES, let alone develop for it.

 

-Chumlee’s Adventure’s gameplay channels Kung Fu, a game I was addicted to as a kid. Was that a game you especially loved in the past?

We had a copy of KUNG FU HEROES but not the original Kung Fu. So, I missed the boat until adulthood.

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Screenshot from Kung Fu Heroes

 

-What was the working dynamic like in your collaboration with Kevin and Jon, as well as Chumlee and Blurry Sprites?

Kevin and I already had a really solid working relationship going into this project. All super positive folks that get shit done!!

 

-Did you have a different attitude toward creating music for Chumlee’s Adventure compared to previous projects? Does the experience of composing music for a game revolving around real people make a different atmosphere for your creative process?

I think the most important thing for a game like this is context. This game doesn't take itself too seriously and is a pretty casual experience. I wanted to use the reference material of Kung Fu but add my style to it. I think that was achieved.

 

-What new challenges or surprises surfaced in composing music for Chumlee’s Adventure?

This was the first game that I used the DPCM Sample channel for. I had a friend record the "WORK!" sample that bosses scream at you... it turned out really funny.

 

-There was a lot of buzz around Chumlee’s Adventure when it launched on Kickstarter. Before that, you were featured on a special episode of The Assembly Line celebrating your work. How does it feel to be regarded as one of THE go-to chiptune composers for homebrew?

Recording that episode with Kevin and Beau was a blast. It is a great honor to be considered reliable and trustworthy to work with-- and will take this opportunity to inform your readers that my commissions are OPEN.  I can write for other systems too! NES to Modern! Let's make a game!

 

-Are there any other projects you have lined up on the horizon, NES or otherwise? Any dream projects?

Currently I am focusing on finishing up Full Quiet with Retrotainment, I've picked up further responsibilities beyond just music for that game. Beyond that, I have some other commissions and some other projects that I might not be able to talk about.

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It’s just on the horizon!

 

-Are there any homebrew games in development that you are excited to play since we last spoke?

As a puzzle fan, I look forward to the final version of Witch n' Wiz.

 

-If you could be recruited for the next licensed homebrew game based on another pillar of pop culture, what would you want it to be?

My first reaction was Seinfeld but that seems like a creative dead end... then I thought Twin Peaks.. my brain is stuck in the early 90s apparently.

 

-I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with me and share your experiences. Is there anything else you would like to tell readers and fans?

Any time! Thank you for spreading the good word. I recently rewrote nearly all of the Full Quiet soundtrack, I am wondering if people would be interested in a cartridge release of what was originally intended to be the soundtrack? I don't want those to be lost forever. Let me know, folks!

 

Conclusion:

Thanks for tuning in to this latest episode of the series that takes deep dives into new homebrew games coming across the finish line that you ought to add to your collection. What are your thoughts on Chumlee’s Adventure: The Quest for Pinky and its veteran development team? What would you like the next licensed homebrew to be about? What homebrews are you eagerly looking forward to? Perhaps you’ll see it here soon when…A Homebrew Draws Near! Command?

 

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